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arranged by u.s. embassy left friday morning. there is a bus on its way from sendai to tokyo right now and many will also be taking those charter flights back to the u.s. it's the first wave of american citizens who will be making their way back home out of concern for uncertainty of the nuclear threat on the ground. all of the focus on the nuclear reactor, though, has overshadowed a humanitarian crisis that continues to unfold to the north of us. the death toll now stands at more than 6,000, more than 10,000 still missing. and we're hearing some evacuation centers are still waiting for supplies a week after the earthquake hit. >> and, akiko, one of the factors of this story many people continue to worry about are the workers there around the plant, in the plant. what is the latest on them? >> reporter: well, we are learning more about the operation that's under way. we understand there's about 20 0 to 300 workers involved in this last-ditch effort. they're rotating about 50 workers at a time. we know they're sleeping in a small living room. they are running out of food. we have not le
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
developments on two big stories. is the u.s. preparing to bomb libya? the u.n.'s major decision to protect libyan civilians from the gadhafi regime. >>> and also the race to stop a nuclear disaster in japan. today's desperate emergency action to stop an all outright meltdown. it is friday, march 18th. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> military action against libya could happen in just a matter of hours. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's son interviewed exclusively with abc news is now responding and is as defiant as ever. >>> and as nuclear crisis escalates in japan, the west coast of the united states is now on alert already monitoring radiation levels there. >> it's funny, too, because they say they have those monitors up already. in seattle, your hometown, will be the first place to know if a wave does hit us. >> and the epa will be watching that closely. that's for sure. >>> we do begin with the dramatic decision to take military action in libya. the u.n. security council voted just hours ago. >> and now the u.s., france, britain and other countries ar
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
. >> reporter: which is a lot more in u.s. dollars. >> beautiful. >> reporter: it fits. can i borrow it? >> that would be great. >> you know, bianna looks great. princess-like. i also think you would fit that bill, too, peggy. >> i would try it on. sure. >> look at that. princess bunker. >> oh, my goodness. you guys work fast. i could go for that. is wills available? maybe harry. >> this is your high school picture, right, a couple years ago, and you were princess for the day. >> that's right. i'm going to go with it. i'm going to say sure enough, that's it. harry's still single. >> i think you look beautiful. >> that's nice of you. thanks, mike. >>> we'll let you know about roseanne barr's huge dispute. it involves a neighbor, a goat and a gun. >>> and we're dropping kim ping kim n's jam here and here. kardashian's jam here and here. e dropping kim kardashian's jam here and here. "the skinny." rlrlrlrlrlrlrlrlrll ♪ skinny so skinny ♪ >>> my favorite part of the day. it is that time for "the skinny." boy, we have juicy stuff. charlie sheen, his latest tweet came out moments ago. we
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
benefit for civil society. and also give that many of these are u.s. based companies, is there a role for u.s. policy to promote the freedom to connect? >> one more from this side of the room. the way in the back. >> thank you. my name is john wooden. thank you all for your really excellent recitation. jackie, i was interested in your comment about more bottom-up development. others wonder if you could operationalize that with some examples. and also to ask whether the model of cooperatives and particular worker cooperatives can play a constructive role here? thank you. >> okay, let's come back to the panel, let him respond to this set of questions and then i think would probably have time for at least one more round in addition to that one. i think perhaps the most efficient way to do this is just simpler to start at the right and work our way across and let people select a question they would choose to enter. if any remain unanswered at the end you have to catch them at coffee after the meeting is over. >> so i will start with the doctor's comments, but maybe take it from low bit of
, fest snag in the no-fly zone. a u.s. jet fighter, f-15 crashed due to technical reasons just outside of the rebel stronghold of benghazi. it crashed in the feel. both crew members able to eject. both crew members safely out of the country. right now, qaddafi forces are dug in and according to the admiral in charge of coalition forces, they are attacking civilians that violates the u.n. security council resolution. this will be the first major test in an urban environment of how air power can help remove dug in government forces. in tripoli, libya, steve harrigan, fox news. >> thanks very much. just touched on the most important thing right now and that is the guys are driving around and killing people on the street. that people in tripoli say what we really need here is a no drive zone. >> that's what senator john mccain asked for. you have to ask yourself this. the minute we said there's going to be some action and we're going to do it to protect the libyan people. we find out that the libyan forces went right into the second biggest city that the rebels held so they start wiping th
anything. >>alisyn: and he called it racist saying the u.s. and others are colonizing libya. muammar qaddafi is claiming there is a cease-fire and then, yet, going on, to say all of this stuff, they are massacring us and imposing a no-fly zone after the other and one military attack after another. this is hatred and racism. >> there are fears of terrorism in the united states in the allied power that will take on this effort in libya and that has been made clear by the white house. we have to also understand based upon muammar qaddafi's history of being allied with the greatest terrorists of the 20th century and the strongman dictators there will be a military response and we see it today, obviously not keeping the cease-fire. >> we will bring you the latest from libya all morning and we have a few other headlines. starting with this news alert. video giving us a look at the containment efforts going on at the nuclear sites in japan, spraying the reactors with water to keep temperatures down and stop a melt down. the real goal to restore the electric cooling pump. workers connected a
to his people. i also have stated that it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go go. and we've got a wide range of tools in our military efforts to support that policy. we were very rapid in initiating unilateral sanctions and then helping to mobilize international sanctions against the qaddafi regime. >> rose: joining me now from the eastern city of tobruk is richard engel, chief foreign correspondent for nbc news. >> it's a pleasure, charlie. >> rose: what's your sense of this war? what factors on the ground influence the way you see it? >> the rebels here obviously are very excited that they finally have international support, particularly american support they feel that they have suddenly been recognized by the greatest military in the world, the u.s. military, and that army and air strikes and naval strikes will carry them to tripoli. i'm not sure if that's what the intended message is from the united states but it's how it's been perceived here and the rebel strategy seems to be allow the air strikes to continue to decimate qaddafi's army and they can do this very slow march
in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? t t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex global economy. it's just one reason over 80% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> neil: over here and there, this morning, all at once union protestors at a fever pitch. dozens of rallies in america. new york city marching against tax breaks for big companies and in london protestors marching and we are told from our lloyd weber that missiles in england is a hard object. i didn't know that. apparently that is not the case. elizabeth mcdonald. you know why we have her here. she is so smart and it is scary. she got a 1600 on the s.a.t.. fbn, she is out in the union rally yesterday. turned into a rally and walking around and doing a stand up and walking around and telling the union how pathetic they are and they are dinosaurs. she had no fear and they were
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
a country that has not attacked us? >> you know, i think barack obama and the u.s. is obviously in a tough place here. a country like the united states, there's a -- we have fundamental values that we are in favor of. and you know, gadhafi, you never know what he is going to do. there's always the potential of humanitarian disaster in libya. and i think that starting off with the u.n. resolution, the idea of the no-fly zone is a good start. do i believe that you need to move cautiously but i don't think the united states can just sit back and watch some terrible happening unfold in libya. >> especially if the president makes pronouncements like he has. especially the fact that he has been saying that gadhafi must go. i don't know what this has done to his credibility to not act on it. >> did the president make the right call? >> we're not doing this unilaterally. you said repeatedly on this show that the united states shouldn't go in there themselves, shouldn't be the world's policeman. >> agreed. >> we went to the u.n., particularly france, somewhat amazingly were in favor of going in the
fighting they captured a key city and held by punishing air strikes from u.s. and coalition forces. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richened engel is on the ground. richard, good morning. >> good morning, lester. we are on the outskirts of ajdabiya. this town clearly taken by the rebels and with considerable help. you can see beind me one of gadhafi's tanks that was obliterated by air strikes. the rebels have pushed about 50 miles to the west of here. so, advancing their frontline in the past 24 hours or so. they say they will continue this until they can reach some more gadhafi-held territory. this is a rebel now counteroffensive under way, assisted by the western airstrikes. lester? >> richer, the nato officials say they're not trying to actively assist the rebels but in trying to protect civilians. their bombs are helping. how far can the rebels advance and is gadhafi's army, in fact, crumbling? >> gadhafgadhafi's army certain this area is crumbling. when you look on the ground, we've seen 20 armored vehicles destroyed from the air. it seems this is not just a defensive operatio
, what do you think? caller: the u.s. should not interfere in the affairs of other countries without their expression. host: bobby, your thoughts? caller: absolutely not. we have had our own brave men and women killed as soldiers and contractors. i do not understand what is up with this obama. he wants his own historical war that he can win. we saw the same thing with bush. we are not the world's policeman. i do not know what it will take to learn this. complete, total rock bottom. why not bring out these unmanned aerial vehicles? host: giving you a feel for what is happening on the ground this morning, here is the associated press saying -- host: here is the front page of "the guardian" this morning. it says that britain backtracked over its military stance regarding libya last night. host: also, "the financial times" this morning, "alarm over libya." coastal los angeles, victor, a democrat, what do you think? caller: in the african continent we have different priorities. why not use these countries in africa? we have pushed most of the presidents of the african continent. it would
with rear admiral gerald huber providing an update on the situation in libya as well as the u.s. military action against government forces there. live from the pentagon. >> we're going to amp up the volume a little bit and then we'll be ready to go. we're here at the pentagon and we're pleased to be joined today by navy rear admiral girard p. huber u.s. naval forces europe and africa, director for policy resources and strategy. admiral huber is here to give a view on an operational update be it phone link again once again as yesterday from the uss mount whitney afloat in the mediterranean. admiral huber became the director of policy resources and strategy at u.s. naval forces europe and africa in august of 2009. he is currently the chief of staff for joint task force odyssey dawn, the task force established to provide operational and tactical international response to the unrest in libya and enforcement of u.n. security council resolution 1973. with that, admiral, i'll turn things over to you. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you, dave. thank you for the opportunity to talk about joint
as well, sean. u.s. -- uss george washington aircraft carrier, second ship destroyer left earlier than expected from a port south of tokyo. the word according to the u.s. navy they are trying to improve the red -- readiness of the . 9 back story with fox news is coming up with -- the back story with fox news is coming up with concerns about radiation is wanting the u.s. military to put their ships a little out to sea. as we know, humanitarian challenge following the quake and tsunami continues. monday new figures, the death toll is higher than we've been reporting, around 18,000. price tag for all this? 235 billion dollars. breaking news again from that troubled nuclear complex. >> sean: sad in many respects. joining me with more on the major international crisis facing the president in japan and libya, nationally syndicated fox news contributor, monica crowley. republican strategist, he lease jordan are with us. -- elise jordan are with us. the thing that stands out is how passive and disengaged this president is. >> i agree. when the japan crisis happened he did a lot of key battle g
. we had forums for chinese cities and mayors in chicago. we recently had u.s. eric mayors conference both in chicago, amman jordan and casablanca morocco. we had conferences for all the south america, central america and mexico canada and the united states. bringing mayors together talking about the same issues how we can work together in best practices. our global forum. we have over 28 sister cities. historically based on immigration. that was historical the wave of germans and swedes and the way eastern europeans and in turn the wave of chinese and mexicans. we had different way so historically sister cities and now we are doing business sister cities and relationship of not just our city but the metropolitan area. the relationship and how important that fits into this whole global vision for chicago in the region which is really important. revisiting china -- i will be visiting china very shortly for an almost two weeks of visiting about six or seven cities. for tourism to come to chicago and for the business community of china to make chicago the area for the center of operation
's response. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, meredith. the u.s. and its allies are escalating pressure on moammar gadhafi. the justice department is being asked to open a new investigation into whether the libyan leader personally ordered one of the worst terror attacks in u.s. history. for than two decades after more 270 people, including 19 americans, died in the bombing of pan am flight 103, shocking accusation from defectors, that moammar gadhafi may have himself ordered the terror attack. sparking calls for a new investigation. >> there have been statements made in the last days by what are now former members of the libyan government fingering gadhafi, making it clear that the order came from the very top. i think we need to move expeditiously. >> reporter: this after two administrations -- bush and obama -- dealt with gadhafi. some of the families of the lockerbie victims have written to president obama and say they are furious, sickened. stephanie's husband, michael, justice department lawyer, was on the flight. >> we had chosen to look the other way because of business
in the >> on tomorrow's "washington journal," former u.s. comptroller general david walker has a report on america's fiscal management. then political strategists maria cardona and john feehery and u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsberg. "washington journal" begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. coming up on c-span, morocco's foreign minister. foreign policy analysts argue for negotiating a peace treaty with the taliban in afghanistan. and britain's government presents its annual budget. thursday night, a look at education reform with michelle rhe and sacramento mayor and former nba player kevin johnson. they will discuss academic disparities between american children of different races and districts in country and why they hit the has worsened despite a doublinging of spending over the years. >> we all have to do our part. there are far too many kids that are lang witching in schools that are not doing well 3789 there are also kids that live in nice neighborhoods. >> i concur with him. >> you know, we are in a position right now in this country where if you were to tell me the zip code that a
in the u.s. to congressmen and people on the left and right and journalists and think tanks and ordinary citizens and the same conclusion kept leaping out at me again and again. most americans do not realize how lucky they are you know, the political institution defined the country in many cases unique and almost all cases on usual. i'm talking about term limits, the recall mechanism, the citizens' initiative and referendum and states' rights and localism, open primaries, totally unique feature but ones that make the largest leaders answerable to the rest of us, and above all i'm talking about the direct election of almost everybody. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us, but it's these institutions growing organically growing out of the constitution that has served to keep your government more and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say there are cultural differences. we are naturally liberal people. we got away from the monarchies and the collapse is into the old world and so on. i'm afraid that explanation does not quite work. culture is and fr
that the u.s. finally got involved. the majority of americans believe that was the right move. i said last week, you can't criticize the president on that. it's the timing. it's the timing of this issue and then what was the full fledged mission down the road. and you start adding up now the costs, this is what i think is going to wake up america. do you know that already, this has cost us $1 billion? each one of those tomahawk missiles, 140 of them ohave bee used. $30 million a piece. that f-15 that crash landed $30 million. what about the united states starts arming the rebel? we're talking about billions of dollars here. we have an economic crisis on the home front. >> let's talk about somebody else. is there any doubt in our foreign policy when you look at people that are thorns in our side, it's iran and syria. for some reason, this administration has looked at the eye doctors and said he's a reformer. he's going to bring change. i can't see any change that's good. hezbollah has been financed. hamas has been financed. their allegiance with iran has never been stronger. now, something
. the u.s. government now says robert levinson is alive and being held somewhere in southeast asia. it's asking iran for help reuniting levinson with his family. but iran says they know nothing. >>> the nfl and the players union have gone into overtime. they put another 24 hours on the clock to settle their labor dispute. midnight tonight is the new deadline for both sides to agree on the $9 billion revenue sharing package, or face the first work stoppage since 1987. >>> and airfares are taking off again. the major airlines are charging up to $20 more for round-trip domestic flights. it's the sixth time this year they've raised fares, thanks to high oil prices. >>> there's a major, new survey out on sex this morning. it shows abstinence is in. 28% say they have never had sexual contact with another person. many say, they're just too busy with other activities. >> it was another -- they never had that kind of thing. okay. >> okay. >> it's friday. >>> let's go -- happy friday. you were thinking it. >> fine. now, i have to take it. fine. good morning, everybody. and happy friday. let's ge
administration and the u.s. said the arab countries are dominoes don't, domino pieces and they will fall one after the other. what happens is these projects fell like domino effect. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: and because some have very short memories on satellite channels, let me remind them. not everything that happens our conspiracy. because now they are ready to commence on the speech. but you, sons and daughters of this nation, your dedication to your country that you expressed day after day, and more clearly in times of crisis that you expressed it yesterday with those mass rallies in all parts of the country give me more confidence and make me steadfast, and that you work in face of the division give me hope for the future. and if you said with our soul and with our blood, sacrifice for you, the right thing to say is bashar assad sacrifices for his country. [chanting] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: and i answer you, god, syria, the people. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i will always remain the son of this nation, will keep
around a number of states and spoke to a series of people in the u.s. senators to congressman to beat on the left and right, journalists, and tanks, to ordinary citizens. the same preclusion kept leaping out again and again. most americans don't realize how lucky they are. you know, the political institutions that define this country are in many cases unique in almost all cases talking about the term, the recall mechanism. the initiative and referendum ballots procedure. i'm talking about states rights. i'm talking about open primaries in a totally unique feature, but one that makes legislatures answerable to the rest of us. and above all i'm talking about almost everybody from the share to the school board. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us. but it's these institutions growing organically out of the constitution that is serve to keep your government and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say well, there are cultural difference is. we are naturally people who got away from the monarchies and closets of the old world. i'm afraid that explan
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
president to lead a reassessment of u.s. strategy as it interacts in this part of the world? we need more people like you that know that part of the world. pete hoekstra, thank you very much. >> the president is making a hundred tough decisions a day but, all right -- >> it's our job. >> good night. pie piers morgan starts right now. >>> rod stewart is one of the original rock 'n' roll bad boys. ♪ hey wait because i'm on the verge of singing ♪ >> piers morgan is in the house. not any house, he's in my house, what on earth is he doing here. ♪ and it's raining >> can you believe he just turned 66? and became a father for the eighth time? do you still think he's sexy. >> whatever you mind. >> here i am at rod stewart's palatial beverly hills mance. ♪ if you want my body and you think i'm sexy ♪ ? i'm told the only thing that's more impressive than the great man himself is what lies behind those doors. let us go and find out, shall we ♪ come on honey tell me so ♪ ooh ooh ♪ rod, here we are in the expansive library of your beverly hills mansion. i suppose the obvious
on the american revolution, "liberty," are so wonderful. i use that in my high school u.s. history classes. >> guest: that's wonderful. >> host: and this tweet is from a middle school history teacher. it seems it is not possible to determine original intent. your thoughts, please, and that's from chris. >> guest: well, depends on what you mean by original intent. as i've said earlier, scalia said he is not interested in original intent, that is that he's not interested in what people meant to say which is very difficult to determine. but in what they say in the meaning of the words of a given statute. i think, i think that it is useful to look, for jurists to look at what either the drafters or the ratifiers said about given provisions of the constitution. there you can, i think, find information that is of use. there is no original intent, there is no original understanding of the constitution as a whole, but usually the questions are much more specific. and you can find some information, but i see no reason to think that we are bound to understand those or to continue the provisions, to
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)